Meet Our Cultural Diversity Champions

Everyone belongs at UNSW

Part of making you feel at home on our campuses is having Diversity Champions whose role it is to drive significant cultural change around equity, diversity and inclusion at UNSW.  

Rohitash Chandra

“Cultural diversity has the potential to decolonise the education system.” - Dr Rohitash Chandra

Rohitash Chandra (he/him) is a Senior Lecturer in Data Science at the School of Mathematics and Statistics. He has worked in diverse fields, such as computational intelligence, robotic manipulators and environmental informatics. Rohitash is committed to increasing the celebration of cultural diversity at UNSW, especially in the acknowledgement that areas including South America, East Asia, Africa and Oceania have contributed a great deal to the history and development of science and technology.  

Rohitash has had experience working with and supervising diverse groups of staff and students, and recognises cultural representation as an important part of the education which needs to be visible in various stages of education and research development.

“I view diversity as the ladder of success in scientific contributions which must be upheld in order to work towards solving the bigger problems of energy, food and agriculture, medicine and climate change that we face in the world today.”

Xiaoqi Feng

“I believe in the impact of an environment that supports greater inclusion and empowers diversity.”
- Associate Professor Xiaoqi Feng

Xiaoqi Feng (she/her) is an Associate Professor in Urban Health and Environment at the School of Population Health. Xiaoqi leads a program of research focused on enhancing population wellbeing through identifying modifiable environmental factors that shape health.  

Xiaoqi has been a champion of cultural diversity since beginning her studies in the UK, and has continued her efforts after joining UNSW in 2019. This has included organising the Diverse Inspiring Seminars on Careers and Opportunities (DISCO) program for the university’s PhD students.

“Diversity is not merely the differences we can see, but also includes diversity in how we think, where we’ve been, what we’ve experienced, how we express ourselves, and how we aspire and achieve a positive imprint on the world.” 

Roselle Nunes

“UNSW is a rich cultural environment where cultural diversity thrives.”
- Roselle Nunes

Roselle Nunes (she/her) is the Front Office Supervisor at the Kingsford Legal Centre. Her role includes the induction of over 500 students who attend the Centre for a clinical course in how to work effectively with culturally and linguistically communities and interpreters. Roselle is also actively involved in the organisation of AdminNet, the award-winning campus-wide organisation that provides a means of communication and networking for professional staff at UNSW.

Roselle is a bi-lingual Brazilian Australian who embraces the Australian cultural landscape while celebrating her Brazilian heritage and culture.

“I feel blessed to work in such a wonderfully culturally diverse environment and welcome the opportunity to enhance and expand the cohesion to ensure a better experience for all staff, students and UNSW stakeholders.”

Tuhina Pandey

“Cultural diversity is much more than the colour of our skin or our food. It is reflected in our values, the diversity of our thoughts and beliefs.” - Tuhina Pandey

Tuhina Pandey (she/her) is a Senior Engagement Officer in the Office of Pro-Vice Chancellor (Education and Student Experience). During her time at UNSW, Tuhina has served as the Cultural Diversity Champion for the Division of External Relations, a member of Cross-Divisional EDI Committee, and a representative on the Respectful Behaviours Committee. In previous roles, she has served as a member of the Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group.

Growing up in India, Tuhina was never consciously aware of being a woman of colour. This changed when she travelled to Cambridge, UK for a debate competition and had her first experience of being ‘othered’. Since migrating to Australia, Tuhina’s experience of racist microaggressions has taught her that advocating for herself and having allies is crucial.  

“What I can offer — as a brown woman, as someone with lived experience of anxiety, and as an immigrant – is reclaiming the marginalised spaces as the centre. Championing the opportunities and experiences of cultural diversity is a co-owned agenda – its success is only as good as the support of the allies. The best outcomes are achieved through partnership and collaboration.”